Category Archives: Lost

mfv Ideal – FD336

Additional information courtesy of Steven Brown

Technical

Gross Tonnage: 16
Net Tonnage: 16
Length: 38 ft
Engine: 74hp 4L3 oil engine by Gardner Engines Ltd, Patricroft, Manchester
Built: Denmark 1948

History

1949: Completed in Denmark for owners not identified.
1952: Sold to W. Thomson, Whitehaven. Fished as an anchor seiner. Registered at Whitehaven as CUMBERLAND (WA14).
By 31.08.1960: Sold to A. Duthie, Fraserburgh & others. Whitehaven registry closed. Registered at Fraserburgh as SERENITY (FR243).
By 31.07.1964: Fraserburgh registry closed. Registered at Peterhead as HARVESTER (PD405).
By 31.07.1970: Sold to Martin D. Gardner, Anstruther. Peterhead registry closed. Registered at Kirkcaldy (KY386).
1970: Sold to Associated Fisheries (Scotland) Ltd, Edinburgh. Registered at Kirkcaldy as PLOUGH (KY386).
1974: Registered at Kirkcaldy as PLOUGH II (KY386). At Oban rigged as a scallop dredger but employed as a prawn trawler.
08.1976: Sold to Kenneth P. Brown, Cleveleys (“Mick” Brown). Kirkcaldy registry closed. Registered at Fleetwood as IDEAL (FD336). Fitted for white fish trawling.
1979: Re-engined with 6LX 110bhp by Gardner Engines Ltd, Patricroft, Manchester.
07.1981: Sold to Melvyn Pearce & John P. McDonnagh (“Ginger John”), Fleetwood.
1982: Sold to Melvyn Pearce, Fleetwood.
01.1983: Sailed Fleetwood for fishing grounds, dense fog and No.5 buoy extinguished. Missed channel and struck Wyre Light, sprung planks port side, filled rapidly and foundered. Crew picked up by NAIOM UINSIONN (BS85) (Sk.Barry Hampson) and landed at Fleetwood. Attempts made to raise but settled in scour of the light and filled with sand. Masts and top of gantry cut off and abandoned. Occasionally shows above sand.

Click to enlarge images

mfv Harvester PD405

mfv Harvester PD405

mfv Ideal FD386

mfv Ideal FD386

Changelog
16/01/2017: Page published.
22/01/2017: Added information.
22/01/2017: Added image and more information.

iv Charlotte FD112

Technical and historical information needed about this vessel. Please contact info@fleetwood-fishing-industry.co.uk
Information courtesy of Paul Evans

Technical

Completed: 1909
Length: 33 ft
Breadth: 10’ 1”
Depth: 4’ 8”
Net Tonnage: 10.27
Built: Arnside

History

1908: Built at Arnside as CHARLOTTE for John Abram of 29 Rhyl Street, Fleetwood.
14/07/1909: Registered by owner at Fleetwood (FD112).
01/11/1920: Owned by Richard Abram of 30 Hesketh Place, Fleetwood.
23/10/1925: Reported as having an auxiliary motor fitted.
12/11/1945: Sold to Richard ‘Couch’ Wright of 79 Victoria Street, Fleetwood.
24/07/1961: Vessel struck a buoy and sank in Liverpool Bay.

Click to enlarge images

iv Charlotte FD112

iv Charlotte FD112
Picture courtesy of Paul Evans

iv Charlotte FD112

iv Charlotte FD112
Picture courtesy of Mitchy

iv Charlotte FD112

iv Charlotte FD112
Picture courtesy of Mitchy

Changelog
08/12/2016: Page re-published due to site problems.

M.T. Stephil – A41

Technical

Gross Tonnage: 48
Net Tonnage: 48
Length: 73 ft
Breadth 19′ 6″
Depth: 10 ft
Built: Richard Dunston Ltd, Thorne, 1968
Engine: Lister Blackstone turbo charged model ERS4MGR. Diesel 330bhp, 750 Rpm

History

1968: Completed by Richard Dunston Ltd, Thorne, for Stephil Trawling Company LTD, Lancashire, as STEPHIL.
31.10.1970: In Morecambe Bay, steering gear disabled. Weather deteriorating rapidly and STEPHIL began drifting and became fouled in her nets. Mayday sent.
CRAIGMILLAR, (Sk. Richard Farrer) and LONDON TOWN (Sk.Charles Pook) responded and CRAIGMILLAR made five attempts to tow the STEPHIL back to port but the foul weather broke the towline time and time again. Meanwhile, LONDON TOWN kept a vigilant eye on the situation.
STEPHIL crew launched RFD and boarded CRAIGMILLAR before STEPHIL stranded on Walney Island.
Efforts were made to secure the vessel but she was swept away and sank.
1972: Wreck raised by the floating barge TAKLIFT-1 (United Towing Co Ltd, Hull). TAKLIFT-1 moved the wreck to Wyre Light but it was discovered that the crane could not fit through the lockpits. STEPHIL was discovered to be too badly damaged by her stay on the bottom off Walney Island, that she was eventually taken to Barrow and broken up.
Crew: Skipper Ray Barkworth,Vic Barkworth engineer, Bill Edwards mate and Charles Hambly deckhand.

Note
As 90MPH gales lashed her island home, Peggy Braithwaite, Britain’s only female lighthouse-keeper, peered into the afternoon storm at the stricken vessel lying some miles away on the beach below.
From her vantage point atop Walney light she could make out the grim shape of the pocket-trawler which she later described as being “bounced on the beach by the waves.”
Later that November day in 1970, she saw the ship tugged relentlessly from her moorings, swept from the South Hawes shoreline, and deposited in the Barrow channel. The elements had won, and the tiny trawler sank from view. Fortunately however, Barrow harbor officials had taken bearings of her last position – a detail which was to be crucial in later developments.
The 40ft craft was one of a new-style miniature fishing vessel known in the trade as a ‘Sputnik’ trawler and used for local and Scottish coastal fishing. Her name – STEPHIL.
STEPHIL’s visit to Peggy Braithwaites back yard, so to speak, had been very brief. It had arrived on her shores after an 18-hour drama which had begun three days earlier on the last day in October of the year, 1970.
The STEPHIL had sailed early morning that Saturday but ran into two unfortunate events: One was that the steering gear broke down, the other was that the weather went from bad to worse and then to near hurricane conditions.
There were four Fleetwood men on board: Skipper Ray Barkworth with his brother Vic as engineer, Bill Edwards as mate and Charles Hambly as deckhand.
As the seas grew mountainous, STEPHIL – uncontrollable – became enmeshed in her own net and began drifting 25 miles across Morecambe Bay. All attempts to free the propeller failed and with the vessel tossing like a cork the Skipper radioed for help. As always in these circumstances the fishing fraternity lost no time in providing assistance.
Out of the tempest came another pocket-trawler CRAIGMILLAR and a near-water trawler LONDON TOWN.
Reports say that CRAIGMILLAR, with Skipper Richard Farrer aboard, made five attempts to tow the STEPHIL back to port but the foul weather broke the towline time and time again.Meanwhile, LONDON TOWN under control of Charles Pook, kept a vigilant eye on the situation. If the CRAIGMILLAR got into difficulties too, he would have a real mess on his hands.
All the time the little circus of ships and wind and wave were bearing relentlessly towards the shallows of Walney Island beach. Shallower water meant crashing waves.
Although reports say that Barrow Lifeboat was launched and that the Liverpool Lifeboat was underway, there was actually no time to lose and the gallant men who provided our fish had to make some swift decisions.
Recently I was able to track down one of STEPHIL’s crew, three of whom were young men at the time but whom I knew would now be in there fifties and sixties – if still alive.
Bill Edwards, mate of the STEPHIL those near thirty years ago, was still living on Hathaway Road. I showed him one of the pictures accompanying this article and asked him if the photo meant anything to him. Bill had never seen the illustration before but it took only seconds before he said, “It’s the STEPHIL!”
I asked Bill about those last moments as the storm-tossed trawler drove towards Walney’s treacherous shore. “We were in shoal waters,” said Bill, remembering vividly. “If the ship drove ashore and rolled over, we would be inside and that would have been the end. I could hear the Skipper talking on the radio to Dick Farrer on the CRAIGMILLAR. Whether he realized it or not, I told him in no uncertain terms that we needed to get the hell out of it and I went on top of the bridge to get the life-raft ready.”
With some agility the four crew-members clambered into the life-raft (a Beaufort six-man re-flatable dingy, often referred to as an RFD) and they made the tortuous trip across 200 yards of heaving seas towards the CRAIGMILLAR.
“It was a credit to seamanship,” Bill recalled. “Jake Hogg, bosun on the Craigmillar, had fastened a heavy shackle to a length of twine and he hurled it, spot on, across the life-raft. Of course, we lost no time in grabbing it and, hand over hand, via a heavier rope attached to it, we made are way towards the safety of the CRAIGMILLAR.”
With skill, Dick Farrer got the CRAIGMILLAR around to them and they were hauled aboard on the lee side. It was half-an-hour to midnight as the brave rescue vessels battled their way to the safe haven of Fleetwood port.
Meanwhile, the ill-fated STEPHIL drove hard onto Walney Island to lie stranded, west-by-south of Morecambe Bay lighthouse. During the days following, attempts were made to secure her to the land by ropes but come Tuesday 3rd November, 1970, the weather rose to gale-force winds and under Peggy Braithwaite’s surveillance, the tragic vessel was swept away and sank as described earlier.
As the months wore on, attempts were made to do something about the STEPHIL until finally, one sunny September day, two years later, a Dutch firm was subcontracted to deal with the sputnik at the bottom of the sea. With lines drawn under the vessel the mammoth 800 ton lifting rig TAKLIFT I brought STEPHIL back to light, from the darkness. Then they began the ticklish 25 mile tow across the bay towards Fleetwood.
The giant rig couldn’t get through the dock lock-pit and the STEPHIL, it was hoped, could perhaps be floated-in. The trawler, however, was quite unstable and the huge rig, with STEPHIL still strung like a puppet from the 120ft jib, had to make the journey 25 miles back to Barrow where she was surveyed but condemned to the scrap heap. A sad end for a top-of-the-range sputnik type trawler.
Bill Edwards told me he had to scroll to commemorate the day they did their ‘Evil Knevil’ (remember him?) from STEPHIL to CRAIGMILLAR in their RFD. Seemingly at the time these craft were rather in their infancy as regards suitability for their use in dangerous seas. Those who used them (or who were so unfortunate as to land up in a situation necessitating their use) were made members of the ‘Porpoise Club.’
Bill dug out his 28 year old certificate scroll and showed me. He smiled. “Somewhere I’ve got a tie, as well. It has a blue porpoise on it…

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M.T. Stephil A41

M.T. Stephil A41, launching
Picture courtesy of Adrian Street

M.T. Stephil A41

M.T. Stephil A41, Launching
Picture courtesy of Adrian Street

M.T. Stephil A41

M.T. Stephil A41, Launching
Picture courtesy of Adrian Street

M.T. Stephil A41

M.T. Stephil A41

M.T. Stephil A41

M.T. Stephil A41

M.T. Stephil A41

M.T. Stephil A41

M.T. Stephil A41

M.T. Stephil A41

Changelog
05/12/2016: Page re-published due to site problems.

M.L. St. Richard – GY134

In Boston (Fleetwood) ownership. Did not fish from the port

Technical

Official Number: 182651
Yard Number: S.661
Completed: 1950
Gross Tonnage: 289.34
Net Tonnage: 98.24
Length: 131.0 ft
Breadth: 25.1 ft
Depth: 12.2 ft
Built: Henry Scarr Ltd, Hessle
Engine: 7-cyl 630bhp oil engine by Mirrlees, Bickerton & Day Ltd, Stockport

History

5.1950: Launched by Henry Scarr Ltd, Hessle (Yd.No. S.661) for Saint Andrew’s Steam Fishing Co Ltd, (64/64) Hull as St. RICHARD.
8.1950: Completed as a long liner.
1.08.1950: Registered at Grimsby (GY134). Basil Arthur Parkes c/o 238 Dock Street, Fleetwood appointed manager.
9.1950: Sold to Fishery Products Ltd, St. John’s, Newfoundland.
9.1950: Grimsby registry closed.
9.1950: Registered at St. John’s.
1.1.1951: On Grand Banks foundered, all crew rescued. St. John’s registry closed.

Changelog
26/11/2016: Page re-published due to site problems.

mfv Jean Marcel – FD280

Technical and historical information needed about this vessel. Please contact info@fleetwood-fishing-industry.co.uk

Technical

Part IV reg
Gross Tonnage: 19

History

1968: Sprang a leak due to a fractured seacock. Running two pumps failed to control the leak. Sank in 10 fathoms about 12 miles off Lightning Knoll Buoy The inshore trawler GIRL MARY skippered by Johnny Goodman was close by so the crew (Sk. Bill Chard, deckhands Dennis Priestly and Ken Bailey) managed to scramble aboard her. JEAN MARCEL sank about 1 hour afterwards.

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mfv Jean Marcel FD280

mfv Jean Marcel FD280
Picture courtesy of Rob Six

Changelog
20/11/2016: Page re-published due to site problems.

mfv Yukon Fisher – FD243

Historical information needed about this vessel. Please contact info@fleetwood-fishing-industry.co.uk

Technical

Gross Tonnage: 74
Net Tonnage: 46
Length: 72.8 ft
Breadth: 19.1 ft
Engine: 240bhp Kelvin
Built: Herd and Mackenzie, Buckie, 1959

History

1959: Completed by Herd and McKenzie, Peterhead, for Bantry Fishing Company of Cleethorpes. Registered at Buckie as YUKON FISHER (BCK 107).
1950’s: Grounded at Dunnet Bay, Caithness. Towed of by the Buckie registered vessel ESTROLITA and the local seiner SEALGAIR.
Undated: Renamed MATANUSKA.
Undated: Registered at Grimsby (GY243).
09.1961: When skippered by W Sutherland, YUKON FISHER dragged her anchor while sheltering from westerly gales in the Pentland Firth and was driven ashore at little sands Dwarwick Head. After her five-man crew safely swam ashore, YUKON FISHER was successfully refloated when the weather abated and towed to Herd & Mackenzie’s Buckie shipyard for keel repairs.
1973: Struck a submerged object in the North Sea and crew abandoned. Sank in 10 minutes. They were picked up by the Danish vessel HANS SME and taken to Grimsby. At the time she had 80 tons of industrial fish on board. One of the crew members was Ken Potterton of 100 Margaret St Immingham. The mate was Kurt Thompson. Other crew was Tom Powell from Grimsby. Dated 19th June 1972.

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mfv Yukon Fisher FD243

mfv Yukon Fisher FD243
Picture courtesy of Robert Durrant

mfv Yukon Fisher BCK107

mfv Yukon Fisher FD243

mfv Yukon Fisher FD243

mfv Yukon Fisher FD243

mfv Matanuska FD243

mfv Matanuska FD243
Picture courtesy of Stephen Myerscough

Changelog
20/11/2016: Page re-published due to site problems.

M.T. De Jong Jochem – HD8

Wartime visitor

Information courtesy of Jan Harteveld

Technical

Completed: 1933
Gross Tonnage: 56
Length: 28.76m (93.83 ft)
Breadth: 5.6m (18.37 ft)
Depth: 2m (6.56 ft)
Engine: Oil engine 100bhp by Kromhaut Motoren, Amsterdam

History

1933: Completed by Boot, Woubrugge for L. Kamper, Urk as GELABO. Registered at Urk (UK14).
1935: Re-registered at Urk (UK18).
1939: Sold to K. Post, Den Helder. Urk registry closed. Registered at Den Helder as DE JONGE JOCHEM (HD8).
About 11/12.5.1940: Sailed IJmuiden with refugees and picked up in the North Sea more refugees who were in rowing boats etc. on her way to England, total about 80 refugees among them were many children. The people from the rowing boats were very lucky because the weather worsened and they were sure that they will not have made it to Britain. The skipper Mr. Bertus van Loosen had no sea charts which could tell him where the minefields were, also he was on his own on board because a crew member, who was living in IJmuiden, refused to go with him, the rest of his crew were living in Den Helder and were at home. His idea was to take the people to England and then return to Holland. On arrival in England he was directed to Fleetwood.
1942: Re-engined with a 110bhp oil engine by Gardner & Co Ltd, Patricroft, Manchester.
1942-1945: Fishing from Fleetwood.
1945: Returned to Holland.
1953: Re-engined with a 150bhp oil engine by Kromhaut Motoren, Amsterdam.
7.10.1954: On a trip, five crew. During a NW storm the vessel was lost with all hand NW from Den Helder, skipper Bertus van Loosen was not on board this time.

Note – DE JONGE JOCHEM was the only Den Helder registered vessel that escaped to England.

Changelog
17/11/2016: Page re-published due to site problems.

iv Wild Rose – FD86

Information courtesy of Paul Evans

Technical

Net Tonnage: 8.00
Length: 37′
Breadth: 11′
Depth: 4′ 5″

History

10/03/1902: Launched at Crossfield Brothers of Arnside as WILD ROSE for Nicholas Leatherhead of 1 Balmoral Terrace, Fleetwood.
1902: Completed.
15/03/1902: Registered at Fleetwood (FD86).
01/05/1928: Sold to James Leadbetter of 16 Kent Street, Fleetwood.
01/08/1961: Purchased by Richard Wright of 79 Victoria Street, Fleetwood.
09/10/1962: Owned by Arthur Albert Hardington of 6 Fairclough Road, Thornton.
28/11/1963: Recorded as a total loss.

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iv Wild Rose FD86

iv Wild Rose FD86
Picture courtesy of The George Westwood Collection

Changelog
12/11/2016: Page re-published due to site problems.

M.T. Stamila – SN10

Technical and historical information needed about this vessel. Please contact info@fleetwood-fishing-industry.co.uk

Technical

Gross Tonnage: 22
Net Tonnage: 22
Length: 55 ft

History

1951: Completed in Poland.
1964: Sold to B. F. Zych, Grimsby. Registered at Grimsby as STAMILA (GY703).
1964: Re measured under Part IV – 22grt 22n 55ft
1970: Sold to Pawel Patrozalek, Newcastle upon Tyne. Grimsby registry closed. Registered at North Shields (SN10).
1975: Sold to Christopherson, Fleetwood & others.
Undated: Sunk in the Lune Deeps.
1984: Not in Olsen’s.

Daily Mail video of sinking

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M.T. Stamila SN10

M.T. Stamila SN10

M.T. Stamila SN10

M.T. Stamila GY703
Picture courtesy of David Slinger

Changelog
07/11/2016: Page re-published due to site problems.

M.T. Boston Pegasus – LT58

Technical

Official Number: 183999
Yard Number: 421
Completed: 1954
Gross Tonnage: 166
Net Tonnage: 57
Length: 103 ft
Breadth: 22′ 1″
Depth: 10′ 9″
Built: Richards Ironworks Ltd, Lowestoft
Engine: 2 stroke 6-cyl 370bhp Crossley by Crossley Bros Ltd, Manchester
Owner: Pegasus Trawling Co Ltd, Fleetwood (Boston Group)

History

3.7.1954: Launched by Richards Ironworks Ltd, Lowestoft (Yd.No.421) for Pegasus Trawling Co Ltd, Fleetwood part of the Boston Group. Arthur W. Suddaby, Lowestoft, manager. Registered at Lowestoft (LT58).
1971: Sold to Layhill Chartering Ltd, 34 Crutched Friars, London, EC3. Renamed PENZANCE PEGASUS. Lowestoft registry closed. Registered at Penzance (PZ375).
1974: Sold to Safetyships Ltd, Aberdeen (John Brown & Sons (Aberdeen) Ltd, managers. Renamed KILSYTH.
December 1976: Sold to M. Nichols, Middlesbrough for demolition.
13th January 1977: Drove ashore at Whitley Bay after breaking adrift from tug NIPAROUND towing her from Aberdeen to Tees.

More Information
When fishing in the region of Botney Gap, about 90 miles northeast of Lowestoft, the vessel trawled up a live depth charge. The corroded depth charge came onto the deck when the cod end was unfastened. It was heaved over the side by the crew, but as it sank a ship’s length away it exploded. The crew and the trawler were badly shaken and the compass was thrown out of its gimbal rings. Food was also thrown out of the pantry.

The skipper said that on inspection there was no damage apart from electrical trouble in the engine room. He stated that the probability was that when the depth charge was dropped in the water originally it had failed to go off and that the thump on the deck of the Boston Pegasus has made it ‘live’ again. On her return the vessel was slipped for a thorough examination.

Notes
Believed working from Fleetwood Between 14/01/57 and 01/08/59.

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M.T. Kilsyth PZ375

M.T. Kilsyth PZ375
Picture courtesy of Frank Pook

M.T. Kilsyth PZ375

M.T. Kilsyth PZ375

M.T. Kilsyth PZ375

M.T. Kilsyth PZ375
Picture courtesy of David Slinger

Changelog
03/11/2016: Page re-published due to site problems.